Co-Host Best Practices

Hello and welcome!

So, you’re having trouble building a Core Group. Or you want to co-host a party using The 2-Hour Cocktail Party formula.

Use these tips and tricks to make sure it is a success:

Co-hosting

Co-hosting with a friend or colleague can be a great way to meet new people and alleviate the stresses of filling up a guest list. Many new hosts have found co-hosting to be an incredibly successful way to build connections.

However, co-hosting is a move for a confident host. I don’t recommend co-hosting before your fourth party because of the dynamics involved in sharing the space and guest list. Plus I want you to get the fundamentals and mechanics of icebreakers and hosting mastered.

How to Find a Co-host

If you’re interested in engaging a co-host, look out for someone who knows a lot of people and who you’d like to spend more time with. Note that a co-host’s only real responsibility is to bring half of the guests. You still have primary responsibility for facilitating, making sure that people wear name tags, and keeping the party on track.

Working with Your Co-host

Once you have a co-host on board, ask him or her to draw up a list of 10 to 15 exceptional people they would like to invite to your party. Your co-host should reach out to their Core Group two to three weeks in advance.

Get buy-in for the “quirky” elements of the formula.

Ideally, your co-host would read the book with you. But that’s not always possible.

So share to them the key elements that will make your party a success.

Those include:

  1. individual invitations,
  2. having an RSVP page,
  3. reminder messages,
  4. name tags,
  5. icebreakers, and
  6. ending the party on time.

Buy-in is important so that your co-host will understand and support your process.

The Benefits of Using a Co-host

Engaging a co-host is the number one way to grow your network of friends and colleagues fast. It’s like pouring gasoline on a fire. You’ll instantly be exposed to a lot of great new people who are receiving value from you.

Advice for Co-hosts

Are you a co-host? If you’re co-hosting a party, think about how you will introduce your guests to others. A thoughtful introduction can go a long way.

Imagine you have a guest named Jordan. A good example of an introduction would be:

Jordan is incredibly strong. Not just physically, but in helping others find success in their health and diet and at gyms. If you want to get ripped or get rich, this is your guy.

A bad example of an introduction would be:

This is Jordan. He owns a gym.

If you want to be the best co-host you can be, arrive early to help the host with any last-minute preparations. You can help greet guest and short out the name tags, for example. You can also help guests get their first drink at the bar.

TO BE CONTINUED: Nick to finish this page after manuscript is locked. If I haven’t yet updated this page and you need the full instructions, please email me and I’ll help you out.

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About the author

Howdy! I'm Nick Gray. Most people know me as the Founder of Museum Hack. I wrote a book, The 2-Hour Cocktail Party, about making new friends and building big relationships through small gatherings.

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